Show stopper

Sugarcoating is for suckers. And this isn't a candy store.

Colorful “Butterfly” Captivates in Troutt’s Black Box April 17, 2010

A small space makes for a small play. Right?

Definitely wrong.

Well, at least not when it comes to the Troutt’s Black Box Theater. Though, the theater is considered small, the set designers know how to work the space.

So was the case for “The Butterfly” an Iranian children’s play written by Bijan Mofid. The story was simple enough. A butterfly, helplessly caught in a spider’s web in a barn, makes a deal with the black creature she will find another suitable meal for him. But along the way, as she meets the Grasshopper, Auntie Beetle and her five little ones, the Fly, Lightning Bug and Honey Bee, she realizes she can’t force them to succumb to the fate she so easily escaped. She returns to the Spider who surprises her by setting her free once again, allowing her to return to the sunlight. There is a twist to the story which leaves the audience on the edge of their seats until the stage fades to black.

Though the story was simple, the set was not. In one corner, boxes haphazardly were placed with strips of cloth hanging from the ceiling. In another corner a tall rectangular construction with the sign “Termites Grasshopper’s Carpentry”. In yet another, a foreboding roped spider web, where the play begins and ends, a full circle. In the last corner, a hovel of a home where the beetles reside.

“Someone’s going to come out of the hobbit door,” Ashley Lehenbauer, an audience member said.

The set contributed greatly to the play. Although, Nathan Lee, Spider, did get a little hung up on the ropes a few times. He pulled through and gave a wickedly exciting performance with his hollowed voice. Though, his dance was a little awkward.

Kristin McCalley, Butterfly, was just okay. It seems with every play she over acts. She emphatically says each word to where it’s unnatural. Actors must be understood, we get it. However, let’s get some natural voice variation, shall we?

Luke Hatmaker, Grasshopper, was great. He was dramatic, but not too much, and fun to watch.

I didn’t know beetles could have Russian accents. Apparently, they do according to Joanna Rolan who played Auntie Beetle. Though the accent threw me off a bit, she held her own and was consistent with the pronunciation, making sure the accent gave each word some spice.

The beetles were fun. They were full of energy and really committed to their parts which was refreshing.

The Lightning Bug, played by Matthew Rosenbaum, was reminiscent of someone who took a hit of a bong way too often. He sounded stoned!…but in a good way. Rosenbaum made the Lightning Bug more interesting. A peculiar profession calls for a peculiar personality.

Ben Stonick was sweet as honey as the Bee. He was cute, portraying the pathetic life of a trapped bee beautifully.

John Pickard Creek played the flamboyant Fly. Even though his costume sparkled, his acting ability outshined all the razzle dazzle.

“The Butterfly” was one of the better plays performed at Belmont. Though it was meant as a children’s play, the audience was entertained. The costumes were practical but still interesting to keep the audience engaged. The actors did a great job and the set was truly something to “ooh” and “ahh” about. If you have time, catch a performance of “The Butterfly” before it flutters away.

Performances run through April 25th with tickets $8 for non-Belmont students, faculty/staff $4 and free for Belmont students.

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